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  #46  
Old 09-05-2017, 11:28 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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Originally Posted by centralradio View Post
I just saw in the holiday flyer that LG came out with a dual washer.
Just been reading through some of the wash programs 'bedding, sanitary, allergen, bright whites, sports wear etc. Why not just short, medium & long wash & a temp & spin speed controls? That would be so simple. My cheapo Beko washer has - hand wash, woolens, eco clean 20, dark care, mixed fabrics, synthetics, cottons, cottons eco, intensive, baby & toddler clothing, daily quick, express super short, freshen up, self clean, spin & drain & rinse on a dial. then spin speed, temp, time delay, pre wash, quicker wash, extra rinse, anti crease, time delay & start/pause buttons. I wash everything on mixed fabrics cold wash & things come out clean, it's a 1 hour wash; intensive wash is 3 hours & 8 minutes long, lol...
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  #47  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:32 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
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Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
Just been reading through some of the wash programs 'bedding, sanitary, allergen, bright whites, sports wear etc. Why not just short, medium & long wash & a temp & spin speed controls? That would be so simple. My cheapo Beko washer has - hand wash, woolens, eco clean 20, dark care, mixed fabrics, synthetics, cottons, cottons eco, intensive, baby & toddler clothing, daily quick, express super short, freshen up, self clean, spin & drain & rinse on a dial. then spin speed, temp, time delay, pre wash, quicker wash, extra rinse, anti crease, time delay & start/pause buttons. I wash everything on mixed fabrics cold wash & things come out clean, it's a 1 hour wash; intensive wash is 3 hours & 8 minutes long, lol...
I do the same in my Sears Kenmore top loader.All colors in one run which is about 25 plus minutes.Delicate stuff gets hand washed.
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  #48  
Old 09-05-2017, 08:34 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
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I'm wondering how long those front loader door gaskets hold out.
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  #49  
Old 09-06-2017, 02:16 AM
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MadMan MadMan is offline
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Originally Posted by centralradio View Post
I'm wondering how long those front loader door gaskets hold out.
And... that's the reason why top loaders make more sense. Less crap to go wrong.
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  #50  
Old 09-06-2017, 02:28 AM
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lnx64 lnx64 is offline
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Well, they can still leak on the bottom for both kinds..

Our front loader hasn't leaked at the door in years, and the Hotpoint before it, didn't leak either.
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  #51  
Old 09-06-2017, 10:19 AM
madlabs madlabs is offline
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Bought a Speed Queen made in USA top loader with a mechanical timer last year. Kicks ass, washes great and will last for many years.
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  #52  
Old 09-06-2017, 10:40 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Originally Posted by Dude111 View Post
Yup and better also!

Most traditonal stuff is
Three of my family members bought top loaders recently. Two of them bought them to replace front loaders. They hated the front loaders with a passion.
Back in the 50's and possibly early 60's, coin laundries always had those front load Westinghouse washers. The ones with the form-fitting enclosures.
IIRC, they kept on using them until Westinghouse quit building them.
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  #53  
Old 09-06-2017, 11:05 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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I'd have a top loader tomorrow if I could find somewhere to put it, mine is not the biggest house in the world. Next door have converted their downstairs toilet/wash room into a utility room so have room for a top loader - but they've got a front loader. I've thought about converting my downstairs toilet/wash room to a utility but SWMBO (She Who Must Be Obeyed) doesn't want to so that's that..
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  #54  
Old 06-14-2018, 09:23 PM
midtrans midtrans is offline
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I've only ever seen differing stove and dryer plug configurations. The three-blade types from back in the day appeared to be about the same size, but the dryer configuration had an one L shaped blade. I'm quite sure different conductor sizes are the chief reason for the deliberate incompatibility: Dryers are typically fused for 30 amps, stoves for 50.
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  #55  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:50 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Originally Posted by midtrans View Post
I've only ever seen differing stove and dryer plug configurations. The three-blade types from back in the day appeared to be about the same size, but the dryer configuration had an one L shaped blade. I'm quite sure different conductor sizes are the chief reason for the deliberate incompatibility: Dryers are typically fused for 30 amps, stoves for 50.
Range cords are 6AWG, Dryer cords are 10AWG.
In the 50's and early 60's, it was common to see range cords on dryers, but the receptacle was wired for 30amps.
The NEMA configurations were changed in the late 60's To what is used today.
The range and dryer cords were changed to 4 conductor, to separate the neutral return and the equipment grounding conductor.
It's been the practice in Canada longer than the US.
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  #56  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:56 AM
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maxhifi maxhifi is offline
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Originally Posted by dieseljeep View Post
Range cords are 6AWG, Dryer cords are 10AWG.
In the 50's and early 60's, it was common to see range cords on dryers, but the receptacle was wired for 30amps.
The NEMA configurations were changed in the late 60's To what is used today.
The range and dryer cords were changed to 4 conductor, to separate the neutral return and the equipment grounding conductor.
It's been the practice in Canada longer than the US.
Up here in the north, ranges are always 40A, dryers 30A. And yes we always have had a separate neutral and ground. Really old installations are hard wired, no plug or socket.
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  #57  
Old 06-15-2018, 08:49 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Hard wired ranges and dryers weren't that common, but there was a few out there.
The plug and receptacle was required when the code dictated that there had to be a means of disconnect at the appliance.
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  #58  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:19 PM
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maxhifi maxhifi is offline
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The hard wired ones I've seen were from the 50s and 60s, used a piece of flexible conduit with a 90 degree strain relief, mounted into a knockout on a steel junction box cover plate. Other appliances commonly hard wired here in Canada until very recently are the kitchen waste disposal, and of course the dishwasher.
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  #59  
Old 06-16-2018, 11:57 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Originally Posted by maxhifi View Post
The hard wired ones I've seen were from the 50s and 60s, used a piece of flexible conduit with a 90 degree strain relief, mounted into a knockout on a steel junction box cover plate. Other appliances commonly hard wired here in Canada until very recently are the kitchen waste disposal, and of course the dishwasher.
They did it the same way here!
My house was built in 2002 and the D/W and Disp both plug in. A switch on the wall to control each receptacle. A single 15A circuit for both. No GFCI.
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  #60  
Old 06-16-2018, 01:43 PM
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maxhifi maxhifi is offline
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Originally Posted by dieseljeep View Post
They did it the same way here!
My house was built in 2002 and the D/W and Disp both plug in. A switch on the wall to control each receptacle. A single 15A circuit for both. No GFCI.

My house is from 1962, dishwasher and garbage disposal both are hard wired, range and dryer plug in, but it's obvious the receptacles are not original to the house.

I do like the plug and socket for appliances, it makes replacement simpler and risk free.
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