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Old 01-08-2016, 04:56 AM
Dude111 Dude111 is offline
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I wasnt sure which base was best to put this on....

A VERY LONG PAGE but well worth reading if your into fixing,etc..........

http://web.archive.org/web/200104271...ch_safety.html
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:54 AM
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Thank you for posting this. We ALL know this stuff, but it still don't hurt to review it every so often.
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Old 01-08-2016, 11:13 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Thank you for posting this. We ALL know this stuff, but it still don't hurt to review it every so often.
The article is a British entry. I guess, they are more safety minded then we are.
When I first started repairing radios, I used to buy Carbon-tet for cleaning tuners and control pots. You could buy it at any drug store. No one really knew how nasty, the stuff is.
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Old 01-08-2016, 04:03 PM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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I suppose that with all mains electricity being 240 volts in the UK you would get twice the shock than at 120 volts that is used in USA. I know that some USA things run on 240 volts using a split phase = 120v-0-120v, so if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground the maximum shock is 120 volts. However in UK if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground it's 240 volts. All electric sockets & lamp-holders carry 240 volts. All appliance plugs have at least a 13 amp fuse in them, low power appliances(radio's, TV's, cable box's, table lamps) have lower amperage fuses e.g. 3 amp..
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Old 01-08-2016, 05:58 PM
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N2IXK N2IXK is offline
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A very nice summary. Thanks for posting it.

The part about mercury acting as a "getter" and being the reason for the silvering on the inside of tube bulbs is dead wrong, though. The getter deposits are barium based.
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Old 01-08-2016, 06:52 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
I suppose that with all mains electricity being 240 volts in the UK you would get twice the shock than at 120 volts that is used in USA. I know that some USA things run on 240 volts using a split phase = 120v-0-120v, so if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground the maximum shock is 120 volts. However in UK if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground it's 240 volts. All electric sockets & lamp-holders carry 240 volts. All appliance plugs have at least a 13 amp fuse in them, low power appliances(radio's, TV's, cable box's, table lamps) have lower amperage fuses e.g. 3 amp..
The National Electrical Code, NEC dictates that no voltage in a home or small business is more than 120 volts to ground/earth. All of the newer 3 phase installations, when required are 120/208 volt Y systems.
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Old 01-08-2016, 11:01 PM
Dude111 Dude111 is offline
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Originally Posted by N2IXK
A very nice summary. Thanks for posting it.
Quite welcome mate,always good to read up. EVEN IF YOUR QUITE SURE
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Old 01-10-2016, 05:32 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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Originally Posted by dieseljeep View Post
The National Electrical Code, NEC dictates that no voltage in a home or small business is more than 120 volts to ground/earth.
That sounds much safer than our 240 volts to earth/ground. My house has a '30 mili-amp earth/ground leakage cutout' for the whole house, slightest earth/ground leakage & 'click' the electric goes off. I had one of those George Forman health grills & that was always tripping the electric, one day it blew up completely so was binned..
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Old 01-10-2016, 12:18 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
That sounds much safer than our 240 volts to earth/ground. My house has a '30 mili-amp earth/ground leakage cutout' for the whole house, slightest earth/ground leakage & 'click' the electric goes off. I had one of those George Forman health grills & that was always tripping the electric, one day it blew up completely so was binned..
In the US, we don't have a GFCI, that is for the entire house. Most of the time, it's located in the kitchen or bath receptacle.
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Old 01-10-2016, 12:55 PM
Olorin67 Olorin67 is offline
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I get the impression that the Brits are more safety conscious about technology in general, maybe having 240V electric power is one of the reasons. I read somewhere that if you have a gas appliance, you have to get it inspected once a year or your gas gets shut-off also.
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Old 01-12-2016, 12:01 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
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Thanks for sharing.

The UL should rewrite the rules that all AC items should have a fuse inline including CFL,LED lighting,Wall warts ,Kitchen Appliances and the list can go on.

I'm tired seeing these fuseless crap devices killing people with fires .

It would not hurt on the DC devices too with the powerful batteries.
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Old 01-13-2016, 02:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Olorin67 View Post
I get the impression that the Brits are more safety conscious about technology in general, maybe having 240V electric power is one of the reasons. I read somewhere that if you have a gas appliance, you have to get it inspected once a year or your gas gets shut-off also.
In the UK it's recommended to get gas appliances inspected annually but nothing happens if you don't. If you are a landlord and rent out accommodation then you must get gas appliances inspected annually by a Registered Gas Installer and supply a copy of the certificate to your tenant. But again nothing will happen unless the tenant complains to the authorities. Then you can face criminal penalities.
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Old 01-13-2016, 10:55 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Thanks for sharing.

The UL should rewrite the rules that all AC items should have a fuse inline including CFL,LED lighting,Wall warts ,Kitchen Appliances and the list can go on.

I'm tired seeing these fuseless crap devices killing people with fires .

It would not hurt on the DC devices too with the powerful batteries.
Most of the items cited, have had overtemp and overcurrent protection for several years, per U/L standards.
Most electrical fires are caused by misapplication of the items and most are items over ten years old.
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Old 01-18-2016, 11:09 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Most of the items cited, have had overtemp and overcurrent protection for several years, per U/L standards.
Most electrical fires are caused by misapplication of the items and most are items over ten years old.
Answering my own entry: I pulled a few dumb stunts myself!
I have two fibre-optic Christmas trees, one has an AC motor driven color wheel and the other one doesn't. I grabbed the wrong, lower current wall-wart and used it on a higher current tree. Within a half hour the thermo-fuse did it's job, open primary. I found another at a thrift, for a buck.
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  #15  
Old 01-22-2016, 04:39 PM
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Telecolor 3007 Telecolor 3007 is offline
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You can find Beryllium oxide in home use tranzistor radios or that used only in big power stuff?
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